Spanish language materials for working with highly self-critical and shame prone clients

We recently did a workshop on working with highly shame prone and self critical clients in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was fantastic! The people who attended were so warm and welcoming. We've never had so many people come up to us after a workshop to say hi and take photos. It was so fun (and a bit overwhelming too for someone like me that has a tendency toward shame). As an aside, Buenos Aires probably has the best gelato in the world (sorry, Italy). If you ever have a chance, visit Buenos Aires. It's great and there's an awesome set of ACT therapists there as well that you can connect with if you want. 

As a result of this workshop, a number of therapists and researchers from Argentina graciously took time to translate a bunch of the handouts and meditations from the workshop to the Spanish language. Big thanks to Fabian Maero, Manuel Pando, Clara Zito, Pilar Solanas, Gabriela Caselli, and Manuela O'Connell for taking the time to put all these materials together. If anyone else is interested in translating materials on this site, let me know and we'd be happy to have you do that.

Our goal is to get help to people who are stuck in the isolation and lack of belonging that is part of chronic shame. We'll do this best in community, as we come together to serve shared goals. These translated materials are a great example of that. I hope that some of you are able to use some of the materials for your clients who speak Spanish and pass on the well wishes and generosity.

You can download Spanish language handouts, exercises, meditations, and other materials for working with highly shame prone and self-critical clients here.

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